Justification Retained

But while God can be just, and yet justify the sinner through the merits of Christ, no man can cover his soul with the garments of Christ’s righteousness while practicing known sins or neglecting known duties. God requires the entire surrender of the heart, before justification can take place; and in order for man to retain justification, there must be continual obedience, through active, living faith that works by love and purifies the soul.  {FW 100.1}

Genuine faith will be manifested in good works; for good works are the fruits of faith. As God works in the heart, and man surrenders his will to God, and cooperates with God, he works out in the life what God works in by the Holy Spirit, and there is harmony between the purpose of the heart and the practice of the life. Every sin must be renounced as the hateful thing that crucified the Lord of life and glory, and the believer must have a progressive experience by continually doing the works of Christ. It is by continual surrender of the will, by continual obedience, that the blessing of justification is retained.  {1SM 397.1}

James 2:17 Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone.
James 2:18 Yea, a man may say, Thou hast faith, and I have works: shew me thy faith without thy works, and I will shew thee my faith by my works.
James 2:19 Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.
James 2:20 But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?
James 2:21 Was not Abraham our father justified by works, when he had offered Isaac his son upon the altar?
James 2:22 Seest thou how faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect?
James 2:23 And the scripture was fulfilled which saith, Abraham believed God, and it was imputed unto him for righteousness: and he was called the Friend of God.
James 2:24 Ye see then how that by works a man is justified, and not by faith only.
James 2:25 Likewise also was not Rahab the harlot justified by works, when she had received the messengers, and had sent them out another way?
James 2:26 For as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also.

Zechariah 3:4 And he answered and spake unto those that stood before him, saying, Take away the filthy garments from him. And unto him he said, Behold, I have caused thine iniquity to pass from thee, and I will clothe thee with change of raiment.

Justification Retained2017-02-08T18:38:06+00:00

Oil in the Palms of Christians

Print this PDF Document, or read the following:

 

Oil in the Palms of Christians


“Chrism is essential for the Catholic Sacrament of Confirmation/Chrismation, and is prominently used in the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Orders. Those to be confirmed or chrismated, after receiving the laying on of hands, are anointed on the head by the bishop or priest. In baptism, if the person baptized is not to be immediately confirmed or chrismated, the minister anoints them with chrism. Newly ordained priests are anointed with chrism on the palms of their hands, and newly ordained bishops receive an anointing of chrism on their foreheads. It is also used in the consecration of objects such as churches and altars.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrism


“Last night in our church service, an 8 year old girl, who had prayed for someone, found that her hands were dripping with oil. The minister said it was a Sign that she has the gift of healing. Cupped in her small left palm there was about a tablespoon of oil that had pooled upward towards her wrist. Every time she wiped, it would come right back. She stood in the front of the church and we all saw it.”

—Jean_B. on 6/7/08

http://christianblogs.christianet.com/1126750916.htm


“Sacred Chrism is also used in the sacrament of holy orders. In the ordination rite of a priest, the bishop anoints with chrism the palms of each new priest. In the ordination rite of a bishop, the consecrating bishop anoints the head of the new bishop.”

catholiceducation.org/en/culture/catholic-contributions/the-use-of-sacramental-oils.html


Scroll down toward the middle of the page to see this practice done by The 1 Project.

Finland with the1project


In the KJV, there are two verses which include the words “oil” and “palm.”

Leviticus 14:15 And the priest shall take some of the log of oil, and pour it into the palm of his own left hand:

Leviticus 14:26 And the priest shall pour of the oil into the palm of his own left hand:

In the context of this chapter, a priest is mediating for a leprosy victim. There is represented the forgiveness/cleansing of sin by a sacrifice, the making of an atonement, and more. The priest pours the oil into his own left hand.

If we practice this oil activity without the others surrounding it, are we being partial? Are we partially playing the First Testament priest which only Christ has adequately filled? Are we following tradition more than Biblical directives? What are we doing?

Chrismation is “a rite in the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches that is comparable and similar to confirmation in the Roman Catholic Church.” Apple Dictionary.

Oil in the Palms of Christians2017-02-08T18:42:56+00:00

1 Timothy 4

Hello ______________________,

Thank you for asking about 1 Timothy 4:4-5.
Here are a few thoughts that I hope will be helpful:
1 Timothy 4:3 Forbidding to marry, and commanding to abstain from meats (the word “meats” doesn’t necessitate flesh food. It many times means food in general. Notice these verses which DO use the word “flesh” that is eaten, “Romans 14:21 It is good neither to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor any thing whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended, or is made weak. 1Corinthians 8:13 Wherefore, if meat make my brother to offend, I will eat no flesh while the world standeth, lest I make my brother to offend.”), which God hath created to be received (with this clarification, WHICH God has created to be received, we can conclude that there are some foods which God has NOT created to be received. We could ask, after reading this text, “Which foods?”) with thanksgiving of them which believe and know the truth (“Thy Word is Truth…” John 17:17.).
1 Timothy 4:4 For every creature (WHICH God has created to be received) of God is good, and nothing to be refused, if it be received with thanksgiving:
1 Timothy 4:5 For it (whichever foods one is eating WHICH God has created to be received) is sanctified by the word (extremely important) of God and prayer.
If what we are eating is not “sanctified by the word,” then we are eating things WHICH GOD HAS NOT created to be received with thanksgiving. We are therefore not them which “know the truth,” as stated in verse 3.
All the other Bible verses fit into this context as well.
Here’s a sermon presented that I believe will be helpful as well:
God’s blessing to you!
1 Timothy 42016-10-12T22:30:01+01:00

Verses for Revelation 1:5-6, the Seven Fold Praise

Some verses that go along with the ‘seven fold praise’ of Revelation 1:5-6 are as follows:

Verse 5:

  • Faithful Witness: Psalm 89:36, Proverbs 14:5, Isaiah 8:2, Jeremiah 42:5, Revelation 3:14
  • Begotten: Psalm 2:7, John 1:14, 18, John 3:16, 18, Acts 13:33, Hebrews 1:5, 5:5, 1 John 4:9
  • Prince: Isaiah 9:6, Daniel 8:9-11, 10:13, 21, 12:1
  • Blood: Matthew 26:28, Romans 3:25, Ephesians 1:7, Colossians 1:14, Hebrews 10:4, 1 John 1:7

Verse 6:

  • Kings and priests: Genesis 14:18, Matthew 12:5-6, 39-41, 42(Jesus declares Himself greater than every priest, prophet and king), Hebrews 7:1, Revelation 5:10
  • Dominion: Daniel 7:14, 27, Colossians 1:16, 1 Peter 4:11, 5:11, Jude 1:25
Verses for Revelation 1:5-6, the Seven Fold Praise2015-10-04T16:50:24+01:00

144 Countries

144 countries have been able to access messages of hope and truth through the RevelationWithDaniel YouTube page.

Please pray this continues to spread!

RwD YouTube Footprint

144 Countries2017-02-08T18:44:52+00:00

Remittance of Sins

Question for you: obviously we know only God can forgive sins….so how then do you explain John 20:23 to say, a Catholic, who regularly goes to a priest for forgiveness?

Hello ___________,

The question is good. Here are a few thoughts:

When looking at similar concepts, we must look at Matthew 16:18-23. Christ was saying that Peter was Petros, while He Himself is Petra. Two different words with two different meanings. Peter, or Petros, means a piece of, or a fragment of a rock. Rock, or Petra, means not a piece, but the rock itself. Then He states what sounds like whatever Peter does and says, God obeys and does as well. The “keys of the Kingdom of Heaven” does not mean total access to anything at any time. This is not what was being said. For example: Christ states that He would be killed. Peter rejects that. Christ turns from him (Mark 8:33) and says, “Get thee behind me satan…” Now, if what Christ had just said in verse 18 were true, that the gates of hell would not prevail against Peter, than Christ’s promise had just been broken! Peter was overcome! 

Notice also Matthew 18:14-18. If someone sins, go to him personally. If he doesn’t listen, take another. If he still rejects your offer of reconciliation, take it to the church. THEN we have the similar thoughts as found in John 20:23… The church members must work together with prayer, Bible counsel, personal interaction and corporate decisions to come to the conclusions of what God’s thoughts are about a matter. So, when doing these type of disciplinary actions, we are to find out what God has already known about that someone or situation, and do what we can to work together with what we believe God’s will is in that case. 

We are not called to forgive sin that God must then forgive also because we forgave it first. No! We are to prayerfully search out a situation, doing what we can to reconcile, before concluding that God has either already forgiven someone, or has not, because of that persons decisions. 

There are similar ideas behind ordination. We don’t ordain someone to be accepted by God for ministry. We ordain someone because we believe God has already accepted them and is using them in ministry. Or, we don’t baptize someone to be accepted by God, but do so because God has already accepted that person and we’re showing a public demonstration of what we believe has already happened. 

Remittance of Sins2016-10-12T22:30:01+01:00

Table of Shewbread in Revelation Five

Hello, you said,

“My kids and I have been going through verse by verse of Revelation with you.  I have a question.  You mentioned in chapter 8 that Jesus “the angel” is near the table of shewbread having two crowns, according to Exodus 25:24-25.  I looked up in Exodus and it talks about making a crown of gold round about and another Bible Version said a molding of gold all around.  Here is my question: “Are these two crowns on the table or as I see it as a frame around the table to seal or protect it”  How do you get or see two crowns??”

When looking at the table of shewbread, there are two stacks of six loaves of bread.
Leviticus 24:5 And thou shalt take fine flour, and bake twelve cakes thereof: two tenth deals shall be in one cake.
Leviticus 24:6 And thou shalt set them in two rows, six on a row, upon the pure table before the LORD.
There are two crowns, as mentioned in the verse you sited. Sure, they could be guards, but that doesn’t take away from their symbolism. So, because–as covered later in the series–Christ is at the lamp stands in chapter one, at the table of shewbread in chapter five, and at the altar of incense in chapter eight. He later moves into the Most Holy place in chapter eleven. You can see that all articles of furniture are mentioned–as long as the table of shewbread is pictured as having two stacks of bread and two crowns–one for the Father, one for the Son (as Christ sat on the right hand of the throne of majesty). =)
Table of Shewbread in Revelation Five2016-10-12T22:30:04+01:00

The Work of the Minister

“The work of explaining the Bible by the Bible itself is the work that should be done by all our ministers who are fully awake to the times in which we live (letter 376, 1906).”

The Work of the Minister2015-09-14T14:53:50+01:00

The Millennium & the Holy City

Hello…

You wrote:

“Comment: I am a Seventh day Adventist studying with a Baptist preacher. Could you please tell me how you would answer his question regarding Jerusalem in Revelation 20? I told him that was the New Jerusalem that comes down at the end of the 1000 years. He points out that the New Jerusalem does not come down until Revelation 21, after the wicked have been judged. I showed examples where Revelation is not written in chronological order, but I cannot find any scriptural references that support my understanding that is the New Jerusalem instead of the old. How would you address this? I am really enjoying your sermons on going through Revelation chapter by chapter, I first learned about them through audioverse. Thank you for mentioning your website, I will investigate this site thoroughly. You speak in a way that is easy to comprehend. Thank you for your ministry. I will be anxiously waiting for your response. Thank you in advance…”

Revelation 20 plays the future three times over.

Before: 1, “Angel come down”
During: 2, “bound him”
After: 3, “after that he must be loosed”

Before: 4, “I saw thrones”
During: 4, “They lived and reigned”
After: 7, “thousand years are expired”

Before: 11, “a great white throne”
During: 12, “the books were opened”
After: 14, “the lake of fire”

In verse 9, in the context of ‘after’ the millennium, the Holy City–New Jerusalem–seems to be COMING down, though I don’t believe it is pictured there as having COME down completely. Please notice that it is possible that it is still hovering over the earth, if you will, while fire comes down. Then, after the final destruction of sin and sinners, the Holy City continues as pictured in chapter 21.

Please let me know if that makes sense to you. Thanks! Be blessed.

 

The Millennium & the Holy City2015-09-01T18:51:51+01:00